Pastoral Leadership - Part II

Here is the rest of Lencioni's blog post on "The Greatest Leader In America."Unfortunately, we live in a world where bigger is often equated with better and where fame and infamy are all too often considered to be one and the same. And so we mistakenly come to believe that if we haven't seen a person's picture on the cover of BusinessWeek or in a dot-matrixed image in The Wall Street Journal, then they can't possibly be the best.Consider for a moment those high-profile leaders we do read about in the newspaper and see on television. Most, but not all, of them share an overwhelming desire and need for attention. You'll find them in all kinds of industries, but most prevalently in politics, media, and big business. Look hard enough at them, and there is a decent chance you'll discover people who have long aspired to be known as great leaders. These are the same people who also value public recognition over real impact. And based on my experience, you might also find that they'll be more highly regarded by strangers and mere acquaintances than by the people who work and live with them most closely.The truth is, our greatest leaders usually don't aspire to positions of great fame or public awareness. They choose instead to lead in the places where they can make a tangible, meaningful difference in the lives of the people they are called to serve. The challenges and consequences of their decisions are no less difficult or important than those of higher profile leaders, even if they don't quite qualify for a cover story in TIME magazine.'If you have been encouraged by a pastor who has chosen "instead to lead in the places where they can make a tangible, meaningful difference in the lives of the people they are called to serve" then take a minute to thank them for their great leadership. Believe me, you have no idea how much your thanks will mean to them.